Zatáar – Arabic spice mix


Zatáar
Zatáar

Zatáar is a very common spice mixture all over the Middle East and North Africa. Perfect for chicken, pizza, the bread, etc.

3 tablespoons dried oregano
2 tablespoons dried thyme
3 tablespoons sumack
1 teaspoon salt
75 ml toasted sesame seeds
Just to mix and store airtight until ready for use.

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13 Comments Add yours

  1. Thank you so much for sharing! I have not use this spice mixture before! Sounds wonderful x

    1. Dinner Bank says:

      You are welcome 🙂 I use it very much and its perfect 🙂

  2. ahealthybean says:

    I haven’t heard of this mix before either – thanks!

    1. Dinner Bank says:

      You are most welcome 🙂 its very commond in some countries. I hope you will try it 🙂

  3. Angie Mc says:

    New to me! Thank you so much for inspiring me 🙂

    1. Dinner Bank says:

      Your welcome 🙂 I hope you will like it 🙂

  4. leggypeggy says:

    You’ve got some great recipes here. I’m going to enjoy looking through your blog. Thanks so much for visiting and liking mine.

    1. Dinner Bank says:

      Thank you so very much 🙂 I hope yyou will like what you found 🙂

  5. ChgoJohn says:

    Thank you for sharing your recipe. I’d much rather make my own than buy it somewhere.

    1. Dinner Bank says:

      Me too. I always try to do as much as possible by myself. Dont like fabricated stuff.

  6. Hi: I enjoyed looking through your blog. I love that you supply recipes for sauces and spice mixtures. I have a question about the zataar recipe. I think that I can gather or harvest from my yard almost all the ingredients except for the sesame seeds in this recipe. My question is–Is the sumac you mention the same as the sumac that grows wild North America? Here is a link to another WordPress blog entry about our sumac: http://bellavistafarm.wordpress.com/2013/07/31/sumac-berries-are-good-for-you/ . Thanks, begonia

    1. Dinner Bank says:

      Thank you for enjoying my blog 🙂 Makes me happy to hear. 🙂
      The sumak we using is from east Africa and I have no idea how yours in North America are.Actually never seen it fresh unly dried form. 🙂 Let me know if you find any information. 🙂

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