Can you help me please?


My pomegranate tree looks at the moment like a Christmas tree! Lots and lots of amazing red fruits on it!

My pomegranate tree has turned over to a Christmas tree!

This is the first year it really been taken off. I planted it for about 4 years ago. So it has taken its time. Like all of my fruit trees as well. Guessing it has to do with the fact we are to close to the sea? What do you think? Can the sea has a impact? The wind sometimes comes from Africa and brings sand from Sahara desert…

The hard work start to show

This year the patient of waiting barring fruits. Lots of the amazing tasty red pomegranates as a reward for me. They shining like rubies in the sun as you can see. Any ideas what I should do with them? Can you help me, please?

13 Comments Add yours

  1. Invisibly Me says:

    They look good! I’m afraid I’ve never grown pomegranate & have no idea about doing it. I’m not sure whether living by the sea affects such things but perhaps it does, with different types of soil, different temps, different water.

    I’ve found a few things on a random Google search. This one might (or might not!) be of interest – https://www.growveg.co.uk/plants/uk-and-europe/how-to-grow-pomegranates/

    Caz πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Dinner Bank says:

      Thanks for taking the time to find the link. πŸ™ Looks very informative. πŸ‘

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Monch Weller says:

    Seconding what Caz mentioned above, though I’d say the environment does play a role. There’s a term for that — terroir — but methinks it’s mainly used for grapes. πŸ™‚

    I remember seeing pomegranate recipes from an old recipe book we have at home. I’ll get back to you once I find that book again. πŸ‘

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Invisibly Me says:

      I agree on that, Monch. I know the environment makes a big difference for grapes when it comes to wine (thanks to a wine tasting session I went on). As someone who’s not keen on wine, a lot of the specifics went over my head as I dreamed about getting home for a cuppa tea. I just have no idea about the sea itself other than the changes any location can bring, like with soil, rainfall, temperature and so on. I’d say the pomegranates here look pretty awesome, so once there’s a recipe or two they can be put to good use! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Dinner Bank says:

        Yes I think it’s can be adapted to lots of fruits and vegetables as well. Specially potatoes I founded out.
        When we gets the wind from Sahara with the sand everything gets sandblasted. πŸ˜”
        I like wine but don’t know much at all about it. Just what to I like and dislikes. 😎

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Monch Weller says:

        Now that you mentioned tea, the concept of terroir actually applies to it likewise! 😁 That’s how tea masters manage to differentiate the various teas from plantations. The altitude, climate, soil acidity and sun intensity all play a role. (Ah, that documentary I saw about tea growing comes to mind.)

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Dinner Bank says:

        Do you remember the name of that tea documentary? Would be interesting to watch. πŸ™

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Monch Weller says:

        Oh my, I don’t remember the title unfortunately. ☹️

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Dinner Bank says:

        No problems. I will try to find something online. πŸ™

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Dinner Bank says:

      Yes agree to that too. But I think it should be used for more fruits and vegetables too.
      It would be so kind of you to search for the recipe book for me. πŸ˜˜πŸ™

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Invisibly Me says:

    Recipes –

    https://www.olivemagazine.com/recipes/collection/easy-pomegranate-recipes/

    https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/collection/pomegranate-recipes

    Sorry if these are no help whatsoever, I don’t want to spam your comments with my drivel and random links! x

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Dinner Bank says:

      Thank you so very much! You are really a big help for me and please do spam me. πŸ‘β€οΈ

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Dinner Bank says:

      Thanks for your help! Very kind of you. πŸ™ Now I have started to use them with my twist. First recipe is out on my blog http://www.dinner bank.com πŸ˜ƒπŸ‘

      Like

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